Florence Dress & Vineyards

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com
Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.comFlorence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com
Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.comFlorence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com
Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

SUMMER IN SWITZERLAND

The official first day of autumn has passed already. Although it’s still warm enough to live in t-shirts and dresses, foggy mornings and falling leaves indicate the cold season is just around the corner. Perfect time to share one of my favourite summer makes and vacation pictures. I’m feeling a little wistful summer is ending again…consoling myself with butternut squash and pumpkin soup really does help, though.

We spent part of the summer vacation at Lake Geneva, Switzerland. We took these pictures on one of several trips to the gorgeous vineyards near Grandvaux. Hot summer sun, breathtaking view and hazy mountain tops above the lake – a place of quite unbelievable beauty.

pattern: hacked Florence Dress (Sew Over It), size 10
fabric: 2+m of printed viscose (gifted)
cost: next to nothing: fabric was gifted, 70cm elastic (1.99€/m),  matching thread from my stash, fabric covered buttons (handmade, base from stash)
duration: ~4 hours

This maxi dress I made especially for our vacation, as I wanted to take something lightweight and pretty that would get me through the very hot end-of-August days in Switzerland and France. It’s made from a very ligthweight, soft viscose with a cherry blossom and butterfly print. It was gifted to me by my mother-in-law, so I can’t tell you where it was bought and how much it cost, unfortunately. I love viscose for travelling as it does not take up much space and weighs next to nothing. The fabric wrinkles quite easily, but I usually spray it with a bit of water after taking it out of the suitcase and hand it up to dry on a hanger. It pretty much looks freshly ironed afterwards!

For the pattern I used the Sew Over It Florence Dress, one of my favourite patterns last year, and added a few minor changes to the pattern. For the most part, I sewed a UK size 10 straight from the envelope and ditched the sleeves. By the way, this really helped with the fit of the bodice. I did have some minor fit issues with the 3/4 sleeve version last time. Since they were a tad tight, the whole bodice sat a bit tight around the bust when I moved. Making it sleeveless solved the problem for now, I will probably have to return to that pattern and fit it properly at some point. I bias bound the edges of the armscye.

I had more than 3 metres of fabric to play around with, and with all the Myosotis Dresses around at that time I was inspired to add some ruffled tiers. ( I actually found a print copy of the Myosotis Dress pattern in a tiny sewing shop in France and treated myself to a copy!) Here’s the two versions I sketched out before cutting out:

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I really dig the right version, but the hubby had a vote and set his mind on the left one. Which was probably the only reasonable choice anyways. I later thought the horizontal seams might not have complimented the soft drape of the viscose fabric. What do you think? Should I try the other one, too?

To make the left design, I shortened the skirt panels and cut out two rectangles twice the width of the skirt’s hem. I gathered the fabric with two rows of stitching and overlocked the raw edges after sewing the gathered tier to the skirt. The added panel was cut out generously so that I could shorten it to the perfect length after the dress was finished and waiting to be hemmed. It hits at just the right height, so that I can wear it with both flats and high heels.

I tried quite a few options for the buttons and couldn’t find any that matched the style of the dress or pattern of the fabric. It’s quite a busy print already. This seems to happen to me with all the button-down-front dresses I made over the last year. I always end up making matching fabric covered buttons instead, and it always turns out to look best this way.

This dress is so versatile! I pretty much lived in it throughout the vacation. It’s perfect for every occaison and I wore it at home, in the restaurant, for shopping trips etc. I have a navy blue cardigan that matched perfectly for the cooler days and evenings. It’s a lovely pattern and changing it up a little this time only makes me want to try more hacks in the future!

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.comFlorence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.comFlorence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.comFlorence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com
Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Florence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.comFlorence Dress Sew Over It by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Aslan not only enjoyed the long vineyard walks but also the making of this dress. He has a bad habit of stepping on carefully placed fabric or even falling asleep on it while I’m in the middle of cutting out my patterns. He might have been a cat in a former life, I think.

I’m still dreaming about making all those summer dresses while the leaves start falling outside…Do you have any pattern suggestions for starting an autumn wardrobe to get me out of this wistful mood?

xx

Charlie


Happy sewing!

facebook/bloglovin/pinterest
twitter/instagram

Stay in touch!

What to Sew When You Have an Evening vs. a Weekend

Pattern Standoff Evening vs. WeekendHello there! Today we’re talking pattern standoffs!

Do you have sewing cravings? Sometimes I want to sew just for fun, some days I really want to make something that I urgently need in my wardrobe and, well, sometimes I want to take up a masterpiece project. Most of the time the particular craving depends a lot on the time I have on my hands.

Time is actually quite an important factor when choosing a pattern for your next project. There are a hundred ways to sew a skirt. I can be done in half an hour or it might take a couple of days. That’s completely up to you and the pattern you pick.

I thought it would be fun having a look at some unlikely couples. I’ll share two pattern options for sewing projects – one that can be done in an evening and one that will keep you busy for a weekend. Shall we have a look?

Jeans: Mia vs. Ginger

Mia Jeans by thisblogisnotofryou.com

Speedy

Are you looking for the perfect jeans project? If you need a new pair of jeans by tomorrow – Mia to the rescue! The Mia Jeans pattern by Sew Over It (included in the ebook My Capsule Wardrobe) is the perfect ‘very quick & perfect fit’ pattern for you. I have made 4 pairs so far and they all turned out amazing. The pattern comes together really quick, the only two trickier bits being the front fly and the patch pockets in the back. Fitting is made very easy with a generous seam allowance that’s included in the pattern. I really recommend checking out Sew Over It’s Youtube channel for the video on constructing the front fly.

My tip: choose a stretch denim fabric to make fitting even easier!

Slow & Steady:

You finally want to tackle that masterpiece jeans project of yours that’s been on your list for ages? The Ginger Jeans by Closet Case Patterns is a very well designed five-pockets-jeans pattern with a higher back rise, belt loops, rivets and all! The pattern is incredibly popular and known for a flattering fit and a professional look. You’ll need more supplies compared to Mia, but this is a project of love and a masterpiece you will be proud of! In Germany we say it’s for those with “patience and spittle”.

My tip: Make sure you have all the supplies ready by the time your sewing weekend starts, so you can work without frustrating shopping runs. Take your time and enjoy the ride!

Blouses: Silk Cami  vs. Carme Blouse

There are just soo many great blouse patterns, but these two are my current favourites.

Speedy:

The Silk Cami (Sew Over It) is such a satisfying quick sew. I can’t recommend it enough. It comes together very quick: no fastenings, bias binding or darts! It’s a basic French seamed sleeveless cami top finished at the neckline with a facing. You’ll need very little fabric and very little time! I love to use this pattern for hacks, such as this dress. It probably doesn’t even count as a blouse, as there are no sleeves or anything involved. But this is such an elegant little garment, it is more than just a top.

My tip: Spend some money on a high quality polyester, cotton lawn or silk fabric. You won’t need much fabric, so you can go for quality over quantity.

Slow & Steady:

If you want to take your time and get into more technical handiwork, the Carme Blouse by Pauline Alice Patterns is a great project. It’s a sophisticated-looking, but versatile blouse. It offers a couple of challenges such as pin tucks, a small mao collar, a front yoke, a button placket and sleeve tabs. The instructions are very easy to follow and you’ll also find sewalong videos for this project on Youtube.

My tip: Instead of just following the pattern markings for the pin tucks, take your time and measure – press – sew one by one. I found that measuring the intervals gives a much neater outcome.

Coats: Burdastyle Wool Coat vs. Ellsworth Coat

Burda 09/2015 #117 and Mia Jeans by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Speedy:

The Burdastyle pattern 09/2015 #117A is such a rewarding little project. Not much effort but making a big impact. View B is belted and slightly shorter than View A. The pattern is pretty brilliant as long as you use the right fabric. They’re asking for double-sided wool because it comes without lining. Therefore, it’s a really quick, simple sew. No interfacing, no lining, no bindings. It’s pretty much just three pattern pieces: front, back and back sleeve (plus pockets). The sleeves are two pieces. The front one is cut as a kimono sleeve and part of the front bodice pattern. I got many compliments on this coat and people can’t believe I made it myself. You can check out my version here. No-sweat coat making with this little number!

My tip: Find a show-stopper fabric in a bold colour. Make sure your fabric is double-sided!

Slow & Steady:

The Ellsworth Coat by Christine Haynes is a fully lined classic 1960’s-inspired double breasted overcoat. You can go topstitching galore on this one! There’s a collar, lots of buttons and buttonholes, pockets, lining… basically everything you want and more when your sewing mojo is top-notch and you have the whole weekend in front of you. Add a season of Game of Thrones or Homeland to the mix and you’re good to go!

My Tip: If you’re planning on using a patterned fabric, buy a little extra and take your time before you cut to get the pattern matching right.

Skirts: Ultimate Pencil Skirt vs. Hepburn Skirt

Ultimate Pencil Skirt by Thisblogisnotforyou.com
The Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Skirts are generally easygoing and quick projects. It depends on pleating, button plackets, zips or pockets how much time you’ll need.

Speedy:

The Ultimate Pencil Skirt by Sew Over It is one of my all-time favourite patterns. It’s very elegant but simple, works also as a mini skirt and can be made in woven or knitted fabrics (I tested this!). The trickiest part of this skirt is at most the concealed side zip. I made a version with a exposed front zip which also worked brilliantly. I’ve made many versions and hacks of this skirt, it’s the perfect base once you got the fit right. I made a faux-wrap hack with belt-and-all. I even based the design of my wedding dress on this pattern! It’s so very versatile, it’s definitely worth buying.

My Tip: Find a fabric with a little stretch and focus on getting a perfect fit. It’s a great base for many future skirt projects.

Slow & Steady:

My very own Hepburn Skirt PDF pattern is another great option for a high-waisted pencil skirt. The vertical and horizontal seam lines are perfect for colour-blocking and give you some options for experimenting with style lines and colours. Cutting, sewing, pressing and finishing seams takes a little bit longer, although the skirt is fairly easy to sew. It’s certainly a project for a confident beginner to tackle.

My Tip: Depending on the type of fabric you choose, you might want to take the time to add a lining, as well. Thus, you prevent the skirt from riding up when you walk. 

* * *

Did you find this helpful? Would you like to see more content like this? And what are your evening vs. weekend pattern recommendations? Please don’t be shy and let me know in the comments!

Next time we’ll have a look at blazers, cardigans, trousers and dresses!

xx

Charlie


Happy sewing!

facebook/bloglovin/pinterest
twitter/instagram

Stay in touch!

Another Hepburn Dress: georgette and a satin lining

Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

By now you probably know that I’m a sucker for chiffon and georgette fabrics, although they are difficult to cut out and shit to sew. For some reason I always end up buying at least one chiffon/georgette when I go fabric shopping and this might be due to the fact that these kinds of fabric are usually quite cheap 😀

So, of course I made the second Hepburn using a georgette I bought on Goldhawk Road. It’s creme-coloured and has tiny velvet dots. The fabric is see-through, so I had to line bodice and skirt using a light-grey/silver satin.
Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.comI only had a metre of the lining fabric, so I cut out the skirt without the box pleats and also cut out the variation with a shorter hem. I kept skirt made from the georgette fabric long and since I sewed a narrow hem instead of the wider hand-stitched one, this added another 3cm to the length.

As the georgette is see-through, I sewed bodice and lining together right on left side, so that the lining darts are on the inside and only the right side of the lining fabric shows through the georgette (much like an underlining).Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I used the french seam technique for many of the seams, but did not add any extra seam allowance which is why the bodice turned out to be a bit tight (but it’s still wearable just not as comfy as the other dress I made).

Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.comI love how this dress is playful and smart at the same time and can’t wait to wear it more often. It’s a bit too chic to wear at work, but it will be perfect for going out with friends.

Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I’ve just finished another variation of the Hepburn, the one with the lowered scooped neckline and a mini skirt, yesterday. I hope you don’t get fed up with the Hepburns too quickly, because there are more to come! 🙂

If you haven’t got the pattern yet, it is now available to purchase and download here:

The Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com


Happy sewing!

facebook/bloglovin/pinterest
twitter/instagram

Stay in touch!

A Hepburn Skirt and bold colour choices

Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comA little while ago, I noticed that I often go very safe in terms of fabric choices. For some reason I never go with the bold prints and colours (with the exception of bright red, I guess) and usually grab all the plain colours, especially navy blue. Since the Hepburn Skirt is perfect for colour-blocking, I decided to go with bolder colours, the ones that I didn’t have in my wardrobe yet but could see myself wearing. Well, here you can see the result!Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comI made the knee-length variation of the Hepburn Skirt and chose to use a different for the front and back side panels. The Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Skirt Front and Back View

I used bright pink and royal blue cotton drill fabric which I got for £3.50/m on Goldhawk Road. Quite a bargain, considering that I needed less than a metre for the size 10 version of the skirt. I cut out two complete skirts in both colours and just swapped the side panel pieces. I haven’t finished the second skirt, pink with blue side panels, but for that one I will go with the thigh high length.

Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I paired the skirt with my sleeveless Lottie Blouse, a perfect combination for work. I still have to figure out which tops go together with these bright colours and for the time being black and white seems to be the best option.

Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comBoth variations of the skirt have a vent in the back which makes walking much more comfortable. The pattern includes instructions on two different techniques to sew a vent. Of course you can also skip the vent and wiggle around Marilyn-style.

The skirt comes together quite quickly, it took just a few hours. I always hand-stitch waistband, vent and hem which took longer than sewing the skirt. Inserting the invisible zipper is probably the most complicated part of sewing the skirt. I think a beginner could totally tackle this pattern.

I recommend using medium to heavy-weight fabric. The cotton drill was perfect for the skirt. They had loads of different colours on Goldhawk Road. I probably will pay them a visit again some time soon to pick up more.
Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comI finished all seams with my new overlocker – such a bliss! I actually now enjoy overlocking more than sewing. Is this normal?IMG_0255Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.com(The seams acutally do not pucker at all, I have no idea why they look so awful in the picture above!)Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comAt the moment I am also working on the fitted Hepburn dress variation which combines both skirt and dress patterns. I will make a knee-length version in a plain colour and at least one mini dress that is colour-blocked. I already picked up all the fabrics a couple of weeks ago and can’t wait to finish the dresses as soon as possible. The dress itself comes with many different variations, but (as you can see in the figure below) when combining both patterns the possibilities are endless.

The Hepburn Dress and Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Both patterns are available on the audrey & me patterns page now. If you’d like to get both patterns, you can get them in a bundle at a reduced price (yay!).


Happy sewing!

facebook/bloglovin/pinterest
twitter/instagram

Stay in touch!

Hello audrey&me patterns!

The Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I have something super exciting to share with you! After months of work my new patterns are now finally up on le blog and ready for you to download as Print-at-home PDF patterns.

The Hepburn Collection is the first pattern collection of my new pattern company called audrey & me Patterns. The Hepburns consist of a dress and a separate skirt pattern. Both patterns are drafted to fit perfectly together so that you can combine them easily into a chic fitted dress. Depending on the fabric and bodice & skirt options you choose you can make it into a sundress, a dress fit for work or a glamorous dress for going out and sipping cocktails.

The Hepburn Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comThe Hepburn Dress and Skirt by thisblogisnotforyou.comBoth patterns come in UK sizes 6-20. The patterns are perfect for someone with intermediate sewing skills, but can also be tackled by a confident beginner. The patterns also come with detailed and illustrated instructions, including additional finishes such as a waiststay or lingerie strap guards.

If you’d like to buy both patterns, you can also get them in a bundle at a discounted price. For more information click on the images above or visit the audrey&me pattern shop page.

Keep your eyes peeled for more! Over the next couple of days and weeks I will be sharing the garments I made using my patterns as well as variations and pattern hacks!

I can’t wait to hear what you think!

Charlie x


Happy sewing!

facebook/bloglovin/pinterest
twitter/instagram

Stay in touch!