Recycled Denim Beanie (Free Pattern + Wool And the Gang Giveaway!)

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com (Click through for more info & pics)Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com (Click through for more info & pics)Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com (Click through for more info & pics)Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.comRecycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com
Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

  HELLO AUTUMN

It was the first day of autumn this week and although I wish for summer to last just a little bit longer, the colder season has undeniably arrived. I found myself wearing woollen socks, comfy cardigans and sipping hot chocolate on the sofa the last couple of days. With the beginning of autumn the weather changed here in Germany. The air is crisper and the mornings are really foggy now. So I try my best to adapt to the changing seasons and find some joy in thinking up my autumn/winter wardrobe and digging out some of my warmer handmade clothes.

I finished my first knitting project last weekend! It was a super easy and simple project to dive back into my knitting, which is a hobby I only keep up during the colder seasons.

The lovely folks over at WOOL AND THE GANG sent me some of their very popular Billie Jean Yarn, which is now back in stock. They’re giving away two balls of Billie Jean Yarn for one of you lucky ones and I’ll share the knitting instructions in case you want to make a hat like mine. (All opinions are my own. Giveaway at the end of the post!)

Those of you following my blog know that I’m a big fan of recyling and upcycling, well, generally using secondhand products to create unique things while being a friend to nature. The¬†Billie Jean Yarn is made using upcycled pre-consumer denim waste. This waste is ground back into fibre and then woven into beautiful yarn.¬†The process does not make use of chemicals and dyes and therefore is super eco-friendly. That’s pretty amazing, right?

But not only that, just look at how preeeeetty it is:

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

photo credit: Wool And The GangRecycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

photo credit: Wool And The Gang

Well, long story short – I’m very much in love with Billie Jean! I chose the “Dirty Denim” which is one of three different colour options on offer. The Dirty Denim is¬†60% Upcycled Denim and 40% Upcycled Raw Cotton and super soft on the skin. No fear – it does not smell like jeans at all!

It gives your knitting project a unique look with its edgy and effortless cool look. For a hat or cardi it’s perfect to wear with actual jeans or a white shirt. The Dirty Denim really gives the effect of a lot of texture, so I¬†didn’t use a special pattern – it would’ve been hard to see. I knitted with metallic knitting needles as the yarn¬†is easily separable which was a bit tricky with my bamboo needles.

Now onto making your own cosy & warm Billie Jean hat!

  KNITTING INSTRUCTIONS

You’ll need two balls of Billie Jean Yarn. I used roughly 150-180g to finish my beanie including the pompom. So two balls √° 100g should be enough even for larger sizes. The recommended needle size is¬† US 8 / 5mm, but I found that smaller needles worked better for me. So I’ll stick with that in the instructions.

Size:
54cm head circumference. Adapt to your size and tension if necessary.

Beanie Pattern:
With 3.5mm cast on 80 sts.
Row 1 (right side): K1, *p1, k1, repeat from* to last stitch. So you’re basically just¬†alternating between a knit and a purl stitch.

Now work in rows (knit the knits and purl the purls), repating row 1 another 29 times. (Or less if you want the brim to be narrower!)

Change to 4.5mm needles.

Row 31 Р75: Knit all stitches. Keep working in rows in a simple stockinette stitch for another 45 rows.

Row 76: *k2tog, repeat from* to last stitch (40sts).

Row 77-78: Knit all stitches.

Row 79: *k2tog, repeat from* to last stitch (20sts).

Row 80: Row 77-78: Knit all stitches.

Row 81: *k2tog, repeat from* to last stitch (10sts).

Cut yarn, leaving a long tail, and thread tail through remaining 10 stitches.

Pompom:
Cut two cardboard circles, 11cm in diameter. (Cardboard from a pizza box will do!)
Cut a 4 cm hole in the centre of each to create two rings.

Hold the two rings together and wind yarn evenly through the centre hole and around the edge until the centre hole is full with the wraps. Slip the blade of your scissors between the two pieces of cardboard and carefully snip through all the loops of the wound yarn. I used to IKEA cork coasters hold it up with one hand while cutting with the other. It makes it a bit easier.

Thread a long length of yarn between the two card rings and around the centre of the pompom, then tie tightly in a firm knot to secure. Remove the cardboard and fluff up the pompom. You can then trim the pompom with scissors, if necessaryto get a more even shape.

Use a darning needle to sew the pompom onto your beanie and to hide any loose threads.

And you’re done!

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.comRecycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com
Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

Recycled Denim Beanie by Thisblogisnotforyou.com

To have a chance at winning two balls of Billie Jean Yarn in your colour of choice, just head over to Woolandthegang.com, check out the color options and leave a comment below, letting me know which one you like best!

The giveaway closes on Friday 7 October 2016 at midnight (UTC) and I’ll annouce the winner shortly after on the blog.

GOOD LUCK!

xx

Charlie

Please note: A winner will be selected at random from all entries entered before midnight on 7 October 2016 and the winner will receive the prize described above. There is no cash alternative, and your prize is non-negotiable, and not refundable. If the prize isn’t claimed, another winner will be selected at random.


Happy knitting!

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Sew Over It pencil skirt with front zip

pencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.compencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.comOh hay!

After three months I finally came around to posting this neat little pencil skirt I made in December (or was it November?) last year. I’m way too much caught up in wedding planning and my new job, so I have to dig up last years projects (thankfully we took pictures already). On my sewing table there’s only the wedding dress at the moment. And it’s probably better if it stays like this.

Soo, this is another Sew Over It “Ultimate Pencil Skirt”. If you’ve been following This Blog for a while you know how much I dig this pattern. It might be even my favourite of all time. Over the last year I realised just how versatile it is, from full-on vintage to very modern you can make hundreds of very different looking skirts. I’ve made a mini as well as a faux wrap (yet to be blogged), a wool and also a jersey version.

pencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.com

pencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.com

This time I used the fabric included in the Ultimate Pencil Skirt Kit. It’s a gorgeous green/navy wool tartan, which I absolutely love. I used a very similar fabric for one of my very first sewing projects, a 50’s dress.

Instead of using the matching-colour invisible zip (incl. in the kit) I used a separating exposed zip in a contrast colour. Also, in the original pattern the zip is inserted in the centre back seam whereas I decided to insert it in the centre front. I simply added seam allowance to the centre front, not cutting it on fold.

It’s quite an eye-catcher, but I really really like it this way.

pencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.compencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.compencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.com

To match the zip, I used red thread for some topstitching at the side seams. I added two rows of red stitching, and two rows of black topstitching next to it (which is really hard to see in the pictures). It also really helps the side seams to lie nice and flat.pencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.compencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I tried my best at pattern matching – cutting the fabric in a single layer really helps. I love how the tartan adds to the silhouette of the skirt.

I lined the skirt with royal blue satin. This is really simple – I just sewed it onto the facing, understitched the seam and machine-stitched the hem. I also cut it a lot shorter than the actual skirt, so I didn’t have to worry about the lining peeping out under the kick pleat. I sewed the lining to the zip by hand.

It’s so much better than my unlined pencil skirts. I even went back and lined some of them after that. Although the skirt usually stays in place as it is really fitted at the waist, it tends to crease a bit or clings to your tights. Also, I prefer to line wool garments as they’re not as itchy that way.
pencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.compencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.compencil skirt with front zip by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Will I make it again?¬†Oh yes! I love the front zip detail, it gives the retro shape a bit of an edgy look. Also it’s too¬†cool to be able to pull the zip¬†all the way down – instant picnic blanket!

xx

Charlie


Happy sewing!
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A scooped neck Hepburn Dress

Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Hellooo my ladies (and gents)! This post is long overdue, I can tell you! (Is she seriously posting a summer dress right now? Yes, she is!)

As you know, I released my Hepburn Dress pattern in August and have been working on all the different variations since then. At the moment I somehow sew more than I can photograph or write about (living the dream, guys!) and I really need to work on maintaining a better equilibrium. Otherwise things like posting pictures of summer dresses on October will keep happening.

Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comPattern & fit:

Adjustments: shortened skirt, scooped neck variation, bodice graded up half a size.

Anyhow, as you can see, I’m pretty happy with this dress. I have to admit though, that some things didn’t go as I wanted. First of all, let’s talk about the bodice. I made the scooped neck variation, which has a slightly lower neckline in front and back. It’s a bit more summery than the other two variations, which have a high neckline (pleats are optional). My first Hepburn Dress was a bit tight around the bust, so I graded up half a size for my second one which was a perfect fit. The peachskin polyester didn’t have much give so adding half a size to the bodice was a good idea.

For this dress I used a very soft 100% cotton for the bodice which I also used for the bodice lining. It is slightly stretchy and therefore, has quite a bit of give. With my extra half a size and the soft cotton the bodice now is a bit loose after a couple of wears. It not too bad, it looks much worse in the pictures, but I will have to grade down to my normal size when using a similar fabric next time.

I won’t be wearing the dress too often now, but unless I gain weight over Christmas I will take it in before next summer.Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comWhat do you think about the proportions? The original Hepburn skirt is much longer and I think this one got a bit too short for my taste. It’s sort of a babydoll dress length and I’m not sure, but I might be too old for that. I normally like my skirts to end at or just above the knee if they’re fuller (fitted ones are allowed to be thigh high).

So why did I make the skirt that short then? Guess what, I was stupid enough to buy too little fabric. And since I actually made the pattern and wrote the instructions and should know about these things, you can consider it very stupid. For some reason I thought 1m would be enough (it’s got box pleats, silly one!) and bought 1m of each fabric.

 

Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.com

The fabric:

So I bought 1m each of a turquoise 100% cotton fabric and a beautiful cotton wax print (¬£3.95/m on Goldhawk Road). ¬†Both fabrics are gorgeous and were easy to cut and sew with. In order to fit the skirt pattern on the wax print cotton I had to shorten the hem quite a bit. That’s also why I decided to skip my beloved hadnstitching and went with a narrow machine stitched hem instead.

Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comDue to the softness of the bodice fabric the top bit of the zip is also a bit wonky. It’s probably just too heavy for the lightweight cotton and it stretched out a bit even though I understitched the whole neckline.Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comDid I mention this dress has pockets? I love me some pockets, I think every dress should have them! I will add a tutorial on how to add pockets to your Hepburn Dress soon!¬†

Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comI lined the pockets with my bodice fabric for an extra pop of colour.

Some people have problems with scooped necklines and narrow straps like the ones on this dress, as sometimes the straps slide down the shoulder. This often happens when you have sloping shoulders. The pattern includes instructions on how to add lingerie strap guards which basically solve this problem. As long as you attach them to a goodfitting bra, the straps won’t go anywhere and the bra straps won’t peek through. It’s a win-win!

Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.com

As the skirt is 100% cotton and I don’t like lining my dress skirts (reducing fabric expenses and, of course, being lazy), I really need to sew a slip to wear underneath. Worn with tights, the skirt clings to my legs and rides up when I walk.

I have to really nice satin polyester which I want to use for that. I’m thinking about just cutting out a rectangle and gathering it with an elastic on top. This should be enough for a little slip to wear underneath cotton dresses.¬†Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.comAt the moment I still wear the dress with a little Chanel-style jacket. I need to find a high-waisted cardigan! All the ones I have are too long and look silly with my dresses.

And guess what was in the post when we came home from taking pictures? (Almost) nothing’s better than being inside on a cold autumnal afternoon with a cup of coffee and a sewing magazine.¬†Hepburn Dress scooped neckline version by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I have only 3 nightshifts left before going back home to Germany for a couple of days! I probably won’t get any sewing done, because I will be sleeping any free minute for the next days, but hopefully I can catch up one posting some of my makes when I’m home.

Have a great week!


Happy sewing!
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The new Pussy Bow Blouse pattern by Sew Over It

 Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com

Hi folks! Today I sharing my newest pussy bow blouse with you! After sewing three (!) Lottie Blouses, it was time to try another pussy bow blouse pattern. Luckily enough, Lisa, mastermind behind Sew Over It, asked me to test her newest pattern, the Pussy Bow Blouse. Lisa is known for her gorgeous patterns, mostly basic wardrobes staples (such as the Ultimate Trousers pattern or the Ultimate Wrap Dress) with a vintage touch.

source: www.sewoverit.com

So here it is, in all its glory!

 Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com

 Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com

The pattern:

The pattern was pretty much straight-forward and the instructions are very comprehensive and easy to follow, thanks to the illustrations. The blouse comes in two different variations –¬†you can choose between a v-neck or keyhole version. I wanted to try the keyhole version, but couldn’t wrap my head around one particular step in the instructions (we all have those days, no?) and since I already have three keyhole Lottie Blouses, I went with the v-neck option in the end.

The pattern comes in UK sizes 8-20 and is available as both a printed pattern and as a downloadable PDF. Sew Over It will also host a sewalong in the future, so keep your eyes peeled!

What I loved most about the pattern are the little details: for example the super cute buttoned cuffs. I used a black fabric covered button, which you can hardly see on the polkadot fabric!
 Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com

The fit: 

I love the long sleeves – especially now that it is getting colder I was in desperate need for a long-sleeved blouse for work. This is the perfect pattern! The pattern has some interesting details in the way it is cut. It has a seam in the centre front! The cut resembles 1940’s blouses, sitting a bit off the shoulder. It confused me at first since I thought it was a fitting issue and I thought it would prevent me from moving my arms freely. In front of the mirror it felt as if I could’nt lift my arms all the way up, but now, after I have worn it at work several times, I can say that it didn’t bother me at all. I actually like that it has this vintage look.

The sleeves were a bit long for my taste and I simply could’ve shortened them, but I was too lazy to make a muslin. They are quite baggy and I really like the general shape of the sleeves and the cuffs, but since they are about 7cm too long they cover up the cute cuffs. My own fault! I could’ve at least measured them before attaching the cuffs!

 Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com

The fabric:

The pattern suggests using light and drapey fabrics, such as rayon, chiffon and lightweight silks and crepes. I used a nude coloured georgette, which is slightly see-through and covered in black polkadots. I bought the fabric on Walthamstow Market ages ago (all I can remember is that it was super cheap), planning to make a dress or skirt from it. The print is actually quite busy and I am glad that I did not make a dress – I think it works best for a blouse like this!

The georgette is the perfect fabric to wear at work as it is not too warm (no sweat stains!) and is perfect for layering. It’s horrible to sew with, though. Cutting out georgette is messy and frustrating (never rush, but take your time!) and you have to be very careful that the fabric layers don’t slip when sewing and pinning. Luckily, I already had my overlocker then, so at least I didn’t have to worry about fraying edges!

 Sew Over It Pussy Bow Blouse by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I mostly wear my blouse over skinny jeans and tight dark miniskirts or tucked in paired with a pencil skirt. It’s a perfect office look and ideal for our smart casual dresscode at work. I also accidentally wore it on the day at work when we went to visit a farm, so imagine me watching the piggy race and feeding the alpacas dressed up like a 1940’s secretary. Well, the alpacas didn’t mind.

Have you tried any Sew Over It patterns yet? The Ultimate Trousers are still on my list and I’m eyeballing the 1940’s tea dress, as well.

Don’t forget to enter the blog anniversary giveaway, if you haven’t done so yet! The giveaway is open internationally and closes on 30th September!


Happy sewing!
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Another Hepburn Dress: georgette and a satin lining

Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

By now you probably know that I’m a sucker for chiffon and georgette fabrics, although they are difficult to cut out and shit to sew. For some reason I always end up buying at least one chiffon/georgette when I go fabric shopping and this might be due to the fact that these kinds of fabric are usually quite cheap ūüėÄ

So, of course I made the second Hepburn using a georgette I bought on Goldhawk Road. It’s creme-coloured and has tiny velvet dots. The fabric is see-through, so I had to line bodice and skirt using a light-grey/silver satin.
Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.comHepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.comI only had a metre of the lining fabric, so I cut out the skirt without the box pleats and also cut out the variation with a shorter hem. I kept skirt made from the georgette fabric long and since I sewed a narrow hem instead of the wider hand-stitched one, this added another 3cm to the length.

As the georgette is see-through, I sewed bodice and lining together right on left side, so that the lining darts are on the inside and only the right side of the lining fabric shows through the georgette (much like an underlining).Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I used the french seam technique for many of the seams, but did not add any extra seam allowance which is why the bodice turned out to be a bit tight (but it’s still wearable just not as comfy as the other dress I made).

Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.comI love how this dress is playful and smart at the same time and can’t wait to wear it more often. It’s a bit too chic to wear at work, but it will be perfect for going out with friends.

Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com

I’ve just finished another variation of the Hepburn, the one with the lowered scooped neckline and a mini skirt, yesterday. I hope you don’t get fed up with the Hepburns too quickly, because there are more to come! ūüôā

If you haven’t got the pattern yet, it is now available to purchase and download here:

The Hepburn Dress by thisblogisnotforyou.com


Happy sewing!
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